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  THE RAHA LAB TEAM 2016-2017

THE RAHA LAB TEAM 2016-2017

Dr. Sandeep Raha

Dr. Raha is an associate professor in the department of Pediatrics at McMaster University. He is also an associate member of the department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences and the Chair of Admissions for the Graduate program in Medical Sciences. He obtained his PhD. from the University of Toronto, Department of Biochemistry. His post-doctoral training was carried out the Hospital for Sick Children in the area of mitochondrial dysfunction and metabolic disease.  He then worked in the biotech sector, as the manager of the molecular biology group of FONA Technologies designing and optimizing biosensors to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms. He started his own research program in 2007, in the Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Raha truly enjoys his research program which connects the worlds of basic biomedical research to clinical consequence. Outside of his research he keeps his competitive and investigative skills engaged through “football” (better known as soccer to the people in the 1st world) and exploratory angling (fishing).  All fuelled by the golden elixir of life, the finely cultured coffee bean! 

 

GRADUATE STUDENTS

 
Mike Profile 1.jpg

Michael Wong

I am a PhD student specializing in human placenta research and the manipulation of cellular growth and behaviour using various scaffolds, matrices, chemical compounds, and environmental conditions. While I am invested in academic research, I also have interests in biotechnology and the advancement of Canada's life sciences industry. Outside of the lab, I enjoy good coffee, cycling, and playing guitar.

O'llenecia Sauve

I am a PhD candidate in the Medical Sciences department. My MSc degree in Kinesiology & Health Science was obtained at York University in 2007. Thereafter, I gained valuable experience as a College Professor and a Healthcare Clinician & Manager. It was through my personal and professional experiences over the years that I became motivated to return to academia. My PhD research focus is on the effects of metabolic stressors and atypical anti-psychotics on placentation. When I am not in the lab, I enjoy dancing and playing soccer with my children.

Chitman Josan

I am a MSc candidate and my research is focused on the characterization of adipose tissue structure and function. My aim is to model adipose tissue differentiation and growth on a three-dimensional platform. Besides being highly focused in science my undergraduate education involved basics of commerce, which  allowed me diverse interests and experiences. Outside of lab, I enjoy dancing, drinking coffee,  TV shows, and getting involved in my community.

 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

 

I am a 4th year Honours Biochemistry student working on my senior thesis in the Raha lab. My project focuses on the role of mitochondrial signalling in syncytium formation and development of the syncytiotrophoblast. Hopefully, the elucidated pathways can help give insight to placental pathologies affected by mitochondrial dysfunction. When I'm not in the lab, you can find me balling in Burridge gym or managing my fantasy basketball team on Yahoo Sports.

I am a fourth year Biochemistry student here at McMaster University.  I am interested in understanding the development of white adipose tissue and the effect of olanzapine-induced obesity on white adipose tissue growth and obesity. I will be graduating in the spring of 2018, and I look forward to seeing what the future has in store (as I myself am not quite sure yet). I love science, but in the time when I'm not studying I really enjoy learning new styles of dancing, and hiking.

My project involves the “Placenta-on-a-chip” – a microfluidic structure that simulates the placental environment. Its ability to accommodate a complex organization of placental cells in a 3D culture allows us to study the human placenta in a new model. The goals of my project include the overall advancement of new technologies in the field of placental research. In addition, the development of the placenta-on-a-chip implicates the facilitation of drug discovery and potential therapeutics for use during pregnancy.

 

ALUMNI

Robyn Pereira

Patrick Rodriguez

Madeline Green-Holland

Gurrattan Chandhoke

Geetha Ramachandran

Bhagyashree Sharma